Autism and Oxidative Stress Treatments

 
         
 

Autism and Oxidative Stress Treatments

Amminger, G. P., G. E. Berger, et al. (2007). "Omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in children with autism: a double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study." Biol Psychiatry 61(4): 551-3.

BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that fatty acid deficiencies or imbalances may contribute to childhood neurodevelopmental disorders. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 6-week pilot trial investigating the effects of 1.5 g/d of omega-3 fatty acids (.84 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid, .7 g/d docosahexaenoic acid) supplementation in 13 children (aged 5 to 17 years) with autistic disorders accompanied by severe tantrums, aggression, or self-injurious behavior. The outcome measure was the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) at 6 weeks. RESULTS: We observed an advantage of omega-3 fatty acids compared with placebo for hyperactivity and stereotypy, each with a large effect size. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a trend toward superiority of omega-3 fatty acids over placebo for hyperactivity. No clinically relevant adverse effects were elicited in either group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide preliminary evidence that omega-3 fatty acids may be an effective treatment for children with autism.

Chez, M. G., C. P. Buchanan, et al. (2002). "Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of L-carnosine supplementation in children with autistic spectrum disorders." J Child Neurol 17(11): 833-7.

L-Carnosine, a dipeptide, can enhance frontal lobe function or be neuroprotective. It can also correlate with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-homocarnosine interaction, with possible anticonvulsive effects. We investigated 31 children with autistic spectrum disorders in an 8-week, double-blinded study to determine if 800 mg L-carnosine daily would result in observable changes versus placebo. Outcome measures were the Childhood Autism Rating Scale, the Gilliam Autism Rating Scale, the Expressive and Receptive One-Word Picture Vocabulary tests, and Clinical Global Impressions of Change. Children on placebo did not show statistically significant changes. After 8 weeks on L-carnosine, children showed statistically significant improvements on the Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (total score and the Behavior, Socialization, and Communication subscales) and the Receptive One-Word Picture Vocabulary test (all P < .05). Improved trends were noted on other outcome measures. Although the mechanism of action of L-carnosine is not well understood, it may enhance neurologic function, perhaps in the enterorhinal or temporal cortex.

Danfors, T., A. L. von Knorring, et al. (2005). "Tetrahydrobiopterin in the treatment of children with autistic disorder: a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study." J Clin Psychopharmacol 25(5): 485-9.

Twelve children, all boys, aged 4 to 7 years, with a diagnosis of autistic disorder and low concentrations of spinal 6R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (tetrahydrobiopterin) were selected to participate in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. The children received a daily dose of 3 mg tetrahydrobiopterin per kilogram during 6 months alternating with placebo. Treatment-induced effects were assessed with the Childhood Autism Rating Scale every third month. The results showed small nonsignificant changes in the total scores of Childhood Autism Rating Scale after 3- and 6-month treatment. Post hoc analysis looking at the 3 core symptoms of autism, that is, social interaction, communication, and stereotyped behaviors, revealed a significant improvement of the social interaction score after 6 months of active treatment. In addition, a high positive correlation was found between response of the social interaction score and IQ. The results indicate a possible effect of tetrahydrobiopterin treatment.

Dolske, M. C., J. Spollen, et al. (1993). "A preliminary trial of ascorbic acid as supplemental therapy for autism." Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 17(5): 765-74.

1. This study presents the results of a 30-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial exploring the effectiveness of ascorbic acid (8g/70kg/day) as a supplemental pharmacological treatment for autistic children in residential treatment. 2. Residential school children (N = 18) were randomly assigned to either ascorbate-ascorbate-placebo treatment order group or ascorbate-placebo-ascorbate treatment order group. Each treatment phase lasted 10 weeks and behaviors were rated weekly using the Ritvo-Freeman scale. 3. Significant group by phase interactions were found for total scores and also sensory motor scores indicating a reduction in symptom severity associated with the ascorbic acid treatment. 4. These results were consistent with a hypothesized dopaminergic mechanism of action of ascorbic acid.

James, S. J., P. Cutler, et al. (2004). "Metabolic biomarkers of increased oxidative stress and impaired methylation capacity in children with autism." Am J Clin Nutr 80(6): 1611-7.

BACKGROUND: Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that usually presents in early childhood and that is thought to be influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormal metabolism of methionine and homocysteine has been associated with other neurologic diseases, these pathways have not been evaluated in persons with autism. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate plasma concentrations of metabolites in the methionine transmethylation and transsulfuration pathways in children diagnosed with autism. DESIGN: Plasma concentrations of methionine, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), adenosine, homocysteine, cystathionine, cysteine, and oxidized and reduced glutathione were measured in 20 children with autism and in 33 control children. On the basis of the abnormal metabolic profile, a targeted nutritional intervention trial with folinic acid, betaine, and methylcobalamin was initiated in a subset of the autistic children. RESULTS: Relative to the control children, the children with autism had significantly lower baseline plasma concentrations of methionine, SAM, homocysteine, cystathionine, cysteine, and total glutathione and significantly higher concentrations of SAH, adenosine, and oxidized glutathione. This metabolic profile is consistent with impaired capacity for methylation (significantly lower ratio of SAM to SAH) and increased oxidative stress (significantly lower redox ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione) in children with autism. The intervention trial was effective in normalizing the metabolic imbalance in the autistic children. CONCLUSIONS: An increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and a decreased capacity for methylation may contribute to the development and clinical manifestation of autism.

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