Household gas appliances impair cognition and attention - glutathione alleles

Teresa Binstock
Researcher in Developmental & Behavioral Neuroanatomy
May 23, 2009

A newly published study reports that "Early-life exposure to air pollution from indoor gas appliances may be negatively associated with neuropsychological development through the first 4 years of life, particularly among genetically susceptible children." (1) Indeed and related to autism, adverse effects were more likely if the child has a particular allele related to glutathione (GSTP1). As of May 2009, the study is not yet free online but a synopsis has been posted by EnvironmentalHealthNews.org (2).
 
The new findings about GSTP1 are consistent with previous studies wherein glutathione and related alleles have been implicated in autism. Williams and colleagues reported that "Overtransmission of the GSTP1*A haplotype to case mothers suggests that action in the mother during pregnancy likely increases the likelihood of AD [autistic disorder] in her fetus." (3). Jill James and her team have published several studies implicating glutathione irregularities and related genes in autistic children and their families (eg, 4-5) and have reported clinical benefit when these impaired pathways are addressed nutritionally (eg, 6). Importantly, children with weak alleles related to glutathione are likely to have difficulty detoxifying vaccine ingredients such as thimerosal and aluminum (eg, 7-8), which are implicated in neurotoxicity and DNA damage (genotoxicity) (eg, 9-12). Furthermore, thimerosal itself impairs a glutathione-related enzyme, thus augmenting an infant's or toddler's impaired detoxification of numerous pollutants (13), especially in children having a weak allele in metabolic pathways related to glutathione.

For children and mothers having one or more weak allele in glutathione pathways, we call attention to findings that thimerosal adversely affects mitochondria (eg, 14-15) and calcium pathways (eg, 16).

When prominent individuals such as Bernadine Healy, M.D., former NIH director, and Duane Alexander, M.D., director of the NICHD, and vaccinologist Gregory Poland, M.D., state that better studies and safer vaccines are needed (eg, 17-19), we are well served to pay attention, because a growing body of peer-reviewed findings are elucidating alleles that predispose to damage from aluminum, thimerosal, household gas, and other pollutants.


References:

1. Association of Early-life Exposure to Household Gas Appliances and Indoor Nitrogen Dioxide With Cognition and Attention Behavior in Preschoolers
    Morales E et al.
    American Journal of Epidemiology Advance Access
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/kwp067v1
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/kwp067v1

The authors investigated the association of early-life exposure to indoor air pollution with neuropsychological development in preschoolers and assessed whether this association differs by glutathione-S-transferase gene (GSTP1) polymorphisms. A prospective, population-based birth cohort was set up in Menorca, Spain, in 1997–1999 (n = 482). Children were assessed for cognitive functioning (McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities) and attention-hyperactivity behaviors (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition) at age 4 years. During the first 3 months of life, information about gas appliances at home and indoor nitrogen dioxide concentration was collected at each participant's home (n = 398, 83%). Genotyping was conducted for the GSTP1 coding variant Ile105Val. Use of gas appliances was inversely associated with cognitive outcomes (β coefficient for general cognition = –5.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): –9.92, –0.28; odds ratio for inattention symptoms = 3.59, 95% CI: 1.14, 11.33), independent of social class and other confounders. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations were associated with cognitive function (a decrease of 0.27 point per 1 ppb, 95% CI: –0.48, –0.07) and inattention symptoms (odds ratio = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.12). The deleterious effect of indoor pollution from gas appliances on neuropsychological outcomes was stronger in children with the GSTP1 Val-105 allele. Early-life exposure to air pollution from indoor gas appliances may be negatively associated with neuropsychological development through the first 4 years of life, particularly among genetically susceptible children.

2. Cognition, attention altered in youngsters who live with gas appliances.
http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/newscience/gas-appliances-linked-to-lower-cognition-and-attention/

Preschoolers who lived in homes using gas appliances scored lower on cognitive tests and had a higher likelihood of exhibiting inattention behaviors than those in homes without gas appliances, finds a recent study. The effects on memory, verbal skills and the coordination of complex behaviors were greater when more gas appliances were used in the homes. They were also more pronounced in children with a certain gene type involved with the detoxification of toxic exposures.


3. Risk of autistic disorder in affected offspring of mothers with a glutathione S-transferase P1 haplotype.
Williams TA et al.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Apr;161(4):356-61.
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.
http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/161/4/356

OBJECTIVE: To test whether polymorphisms of the glutathione S-transferase P1 gene (GSTP1) act in the mother during pregnancy to contribute to the phenotype of autistic disorder (AD) in her fetus. DESIGN: Transmission disequilibrium testing (TDT) in case mothers and maternal grandparents. SETTING: Autistic disorder may result from multiple genes and environmental factors acting during pregnancy and afterward. Teratogenic alleles act in mothers during pregnancy to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders in their offspring; however, only a handful have been identified. GSTP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for AD because of its tissue distribution and its role in oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism, and JNK regulation. PARTICIPANTS: We genotyped GSTP1*G313A and GSTP1*C341T polymorphisms in 137 members of 49 families with AD. All probands received a clinical diagnosis of AD by Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic testing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Association of haplotypes with AD was tested by the TDT-Phase program, using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for uncertain haplotypes and for incomplete parental genotypes, with standard measures of statistical significance. RESULTS: The GSTP1*A haplotype was overtransmitted to case mothers (P = .01 [P = .03 using permutation testing]; odds ratio, 2.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-5.13]). Results of the combined haplotype and genotype analyses suggest that the GSTP1-313 genotype alone determined the observed haplotype effect. CONCLUSIONS: Overtransmission of the GSTP1*A haplotype to case mothers suggests that action in the mother during pregnancy likely increases the likelihood of AD in her fetus. If this is confirmed and is a result of a gene-environment interaction occurring during pregnancy, these findings could lead to the design of strategies for prevention or treatment.


4. Metabolic biomarkers of increased oxidative stress and impaired methylation capacity in children with autism.
James SJ et al.
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1611-7.
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/80/6/1611

BACKGROUND: Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that usually presents in early childhood and that is thought to be influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormal metabolism of methionine and homocysteine has been associated with other neurologic diseases, these pathways have not been evaluated in persons with autism. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate plasma concentrations of metabolites in the methionine transmethylation and transsulfuration pathways in children diagnosed with autism. DESIGN: Plasma concentrations of methionine, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), adenosine, homocysteine, cystathionine, cysteine, and oxidized and reduced glutathione were measured in 20 children with autism and in 33 control children. On the basis of the abnormal metabolic profile, a targeted nutritional intervention trial with folinic acid, betaine, and methylcobalamin was initiated in a subset of the autistic children. RESULTS: Relative to the control children, the children with autism had significantly lower baseline plasma concentrations of methionine, SAM, homocysteine, cystathionine, cysteine, and total glutathione and significantly higher concentrations of SAH, adenosine, and oxidized glutathione. This metabolic profile is consistent with impaired capacity for methylation (significantly lower ratio of SAM to SAH) and increased oxidative stress (significantly lower redox ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione) in children with autism. The intervention trial was effective in normalizing the metabolic imbalance in the autistic children. CONCLUSIONS: An increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and a decreased capacity for methylation may contribute to the development and clinical manifestation of autism.


5.  Metabolic endophenotype and related genotypes are associated with oxidative stress in children with autism.
James SJ et al.
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2006 Dec 5;141B(8):947-56.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=2610366&blobtype=pdf

Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder usually diagnosed in early childhood that is characterized by impairment in reciprocal communication and speech, repetitive behaviors, and social withdrawal. Although both genetic and environmental factors are thought to be involved, none have been reproducibly identified. The metabolic phenotype of an individual reflects the influence of endogenous and exogenous factors on genotype. As such, it provides a window through which the interactive impact of genes and environment may be viewed and relevant susceptibility factors identified. Although abnormal methionine metabolism has been associated with other neurologic disorders, these pathways and related polymorphisms have not been evaluated in autistic children. Plasma levels of metabolites in methionine transmethylation and transsulfuration pathways were measured in 80 autistic and 73 control children. In addition, common polymorphic variants known to modulate these metabolic pathways were evaluated in 360 autistic children and 205 controls. The metabolic results indicated that plasma methionine and the ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), an indicator of methylation capacity, were significantly decreased in the autistic children relative to age-matched controls. In addition, plasma levels of cysteine, glutathione, and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, an indication of antioxidant capacity and redox homeostasis, were significantly decreased. Differences in allele frequency and/or significant gene-gene interactions were found for relevant genes encoding the reduced folate carrier (RFC 80G > A), transcobalamin II (TCN2 776G > C), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT 472G > A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C > T and 1298A > C), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST M1). We propose that an increased vulnerability to oxidative stress (endogenous or environmental) may contribute to the development and clinical manifestations of autism.


6. Efficacy of methylcobalamin and folinic acid treatment on glutathione redox status in children with autism.
James SJ et al.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;89(1):425-30. Epub 2008 Dec 3.
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/89/1/425

BACKGROUND: Metabolic abnormalities and targeted treatment trials have been reported for several neurobehavioral disorders but are relatively understudied in autism. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine whether or not treatment with the metabolic precursors, methylcobalamin and folinic acid, would improve plasma concentrations of transmethylation/transsulfuration metabolites and glutathione redox status in autistic children. DESIGN: In an open-label trial, 40 autistic children were treated with 75 microg/kg methylcobalamin (2 times/wk) and 400 microg folinic acid (2 times/d) for 3 mo. Metabolites in the transmethylation/transsulfuration pathway were measured before and after treatment and compared with values measured in age-matched control children. RESULTS: The results indicated that pretreatment metabolite concentrations in autistic children were significantly different from values in the control children. The 3-mo intervention resulted in significant increases in cysteine, cysteinylglycine, and glutathione concentrations (P < 0.001). The oxidized disulfide form of glutathione was decreased and the glutathione redox ratio increased after treatment (P < 0.008). Although mean metabolite concentrations were improved significantly after intervention, they remained below those in unaffected control children. CONCLUSION: The significant improvements observed in transmethylation metabolites and glutathione redox status after treatment suggest that targeted nutritional intervention with methylcobalamin and folinic acid may be of clinical benefit in some children who have autism. This trial was registered at (clinicaltrials.gov) as NCT00692315.


7. Cellular and mitochondrial glutathione redox imbalance in lymphoblastoid cells derived from children with autism.
James SJ et al.
FASEB J. 2009 Mar 23. [Epub ahead of print]
http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/rapidpdf/fj.08-128926v1

Research into the metabolic phenotype of autism has been relatively unexplored despite the fact that metabolic abnormalities have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurobehavioral disorders. Plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress have been reported in autistic children; however, intracellular redox status has not yet been evaluated. Lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) derived from autistic children and unaffected controls were used to assess relative concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulfide glutathione (GSSG) in cell extracts and isolated mitochondria as a measure of intracellular redox capacity. The results indicated that the GSH/GSSG redox ratio was decreased and percentage oxidized glutathione increased in both cytosol and mitochondria in the autism LCLs. Exposure to oxidative stress via the sulfhydryl reagent thimerosal resulted in a greater decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio and increase in free radical generation in autism compared to control cells. Acute exposure to physiological levels of nitric oxide decreased mitochondrial membrane potential to a greater extent in the autism LCLs, although GSH/GSSG and ATP concentrations were similarly decreased in both cell lines. These results suggest that the autism LCLs exhibit a reduced glutathione reserve capacity in both cytosol and mitochondria that may compromise antioxidant defense and detoxification capacity under prooxidant conditions.


8. Homozygous gene deletions of the glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 are associated with thimerosal sensitization.
Westphal GA et al.
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2000 Aug;73(6):384-8.
   
OBJECTIVE: Thimerosal is an important preservative in vaccines and ophthalmologic preparations. The substance is known to be a type IV sensitizing agent. High sensitization rates were observed in contact-allergic patients and in health care workers who had been exposed to thimerosal-preserved vaccines. There is evidence for the involvement of the glutathione system in the metabolism of thimerosal or its decomposition products (organomercury alkyl compounds). Thus detoxification by polymorphically expressed glutathione S-transferases such as GSTT1 and GSTM1 might have a protective effect against sensitization by these substances. METHODS: To address this question, a case control study was conducted, including 91 Central European individuals with a positive patch-test reaction to thimerosal. This population was compared with 169 healthy controls and additionally with 114 individuals affected by an allergy against para-substituted aryl compounds. The latter population was included in order to test whether possible associations were due to substance-specific effects, or were a general feature connected with type IV immunological diseases. Homozygous deletions of GSTT1 and GSTM1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Glutathione S-transferase M1 deficiency was significantly more frequent among patients sensitized to thimerosal (65.9%, P = 0.013) compared with the healthy control group (49.1%) and the "para-compound" group (48%, P = 0.034). Glutathione S-transferase T1 deficiency in the thimerosal/mercury group (19.8%) was barely elevated versus healthy controls (16.0%) and the "para-compound" group (14.0%). The combined deletion (GSTT1-/GSTM1-) was markedly more frequent among thimerosal-sensitized patients than in healthy controls (17.6% vs. 6.5%, P = 0.0093) and in the "para-compound" group (17.6% vs. 6.1%, P =0.014), revealing a synergistic effect of these enzyme deficiencies (healthy controls vs. thimerosal GSTM1 negative individuals, OR = 2.0 [CI = 1.2-3.4], GSTT1-, OR = 1.2 [CI = 0.70-2.1], GSTM1/T1-, OR = 3.1 [CI = 1.4-6.5]). CONCLUSIONS: Since the glutathione-dependent system was repeatedly shown to be involved in the metabolism of thimerosal decomposition products, the observed association may be of functional relevance.


9. Thimerosal induces micronuclei in the cytochalasin B block micronucleus test with human lymphocytes.
Westphal GA et al.
Arch Toxicol. 2003 Jan;77(1):50-5. Epub 2002 Nov 6.

Thimerosal is a widely used preservative in health care products, especially in vaccines. Due to possible adverse health effects, investigations on its metabolism and toxicity are urgently needed. An in vivo study on chronic toxicity of thimerosal in rats was inconclusive and reports on genotoxic effects in various in vitro systems were contradictory. Therefore, we reinvestigated thimerosal in the cytochalasin B block micronucleus test. Glutathione S-transferases were proposed to be involved in the detoxification of thimerosal or its decomposition products. Since the outcome of genotoxicity studies can be dependent on the metabolic competence of the cells used, we were additionally interested whether polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1, or GSTP1) may influence the results of the micronucleus test with primary human lymphocytes. Blood samples of six healthy donors of different glutathione S-transferase genotypes were included in the study. At least two independent experiments were performed for each blood donor. Significant induction of micronuclei was seen at concentrations between 0.05-0.5 micro g/ml in 14 out of 16 experiments. Thus, genotoxic effects were seen even at concentrations which can occur at the injection site. Toxicity and toxicity-related elevation of micronuclei was seen at and above 0.6 micro g/ml thimerosal. Marked individual and intraindividual variations in the in vitro response to thimerosal among the different blood donors occurred. However, there was no association observed with any of the glutathione S-transferase polymorphism investigated. In conclusion, thimerosal is genotoxic in the cytochalasin B block micronucleus test with human lymphocytes. These data raise some concern on the widespread use of thimerosal.


10. Thimerosal neurotoxicity is associated with glutathione depletion: protection with glutathione precursors.
James SJ et al.
Neurotoxicology. 2005 Jan;26(1):1-8.

Thimerosol is an antiseptic containing 49.5% ethyl mercury that has been used for years as a preservative in many infant vaccines and in flu vaccines. Environmental methyl mercury has been shown to be highly neurotoxic, especially to the developing brain. Because mercury has a high affinity for thiol (sulfhydryl (-SH)) groups, the thiol-containing antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), provides the major intracellular defense against mercury-induced neurotoxicity. Cultured neuroblastoma cells were found to have lower levels of GSH and increased sensitivity to thimerosol toxicity compared to glioblastoma cells that have higher basal levels of intracellular GSH. Thimerosal-induced cytotoxicity was associated with depletion of intracellular GSH in both cell lines. Pretreatment with 100 microM glutathione ethyl ester or N-acetylcysteine (NAC), but not methionine, resulted in a significant increase in intracellular GSH in both cell types. Further, pretreatment of the cells with glutathione ethyl ester or NAC prevented cytotoxicity with exposure to 15 microM Thimerosal. Although Thimerosal has been recently removed from most children's vaccines, it is still present in flu vaccines given to pregnant women, the elderly, and to children in developing countries. The potential protective effect of GSH or NAC against mercury toxicity warrants further research as possible adjunct therapy to individuals still receiving Thimerosal-containing vaccinations.


11. Thimerosal induces DNA breaks, caspase-3 activation, membrane damage, and cell death in cultured human neurons and fibroblasts.
Baskin DS, Ngo H, Didenko VV.
Baylor College of Medicine
Toxicol Sci. 2003 Aug;74(2):361-8. Epub 2003 May 28.
http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/74/2/361

Thimerosal is an organic mercurial compound used as a preservative in biomedical preparations. Little is known about the reactions of human neuronal and skin cells to its micro- and nanomolar concentrations, which can occur after using thimerosal-containing products. A useful combination of fluorescent techniques for the assessment of thimerosal toxicity is introduced. Short-term thimerosal toxicity was investigated in cultured human cerebral cortical neurons and in normal human fibroblasts. Cells were incubated with 125-nM to 250-microM concentrations of thimerosal for 45 min to 24 h. A 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) dye exclusion test was used to identify nonviable cells and terminal transferase-based nick-end labeling (TUNEL) to label DNA damage. Detection of active caspase-3 was performed in live cell cultures using a cell-permeable fluorescent caspase inhibitor. The morphology of fluorescently labeled nuclei was analyzed. After 6 h of incubation, the thimerosal toxicity was observed at 2 microM based on the manual detection of the fluorescent attached cells and at a 1-microM level with the more sensitive GENios Plus Multi-Detection Microplate Reader with Enhanced Fluorescence. The lower limit did not change after 24 h of incubation. Cortical neurons demonstrated higher sensitivity to thimerosal compared to fibroblasts. The first sign of toxicity was an increase in membrane permeability to DAPI after 2 h of incubation with 250 microM thimerosal. A 6-h incubation resulted in failure to exclude DAPI, generation of DNA breaks, caspase-3 activation, and development of morphological signs of apoptosis. We demonstrate that thimerosal in micromolar concentrations rapidly induce membrane and DNA damage and initiate caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human neurons and fibroblasts. We conclude that a proposed combination of fluorescent techniques can be useful in analyzing the toxicity of thimerosal.



12. Glutathione depletion promotes aluminum-mediated cell death of PC12 cells.
Satoh E et al.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University
Biol Pharm Bull. 2005 Jun;28(6):941-6.
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/bpb/28/6/28_941/_article

Exposure of rat phenochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells) to aluminum maltolate complex, Al(maltol)3, induced a decrease in intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentration, resulting in a facilitated release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the cell and an increase in trypan blue-stained cells. Similar phenomena were observed as the cells were treated with L-buthione-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) in the presence of Al(maltol)3. On the other hand, treatment of PC 12 cells with BSO alone in the absence of Al(maltol)3 did not affect the cell viability. Pre-treatment of PC12 cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 30 min before a 48 h-exposure to Al(maltol)3 effectively protected the cells from Al(maltol)3 toxicity by increasing intracellular GSH concentration. NAC also effectively inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation induced by treatment of the cells with Al(maltol)3. However, several lipophilic radical scavengers such as alpha-tocopherol and 3(2)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole, and an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, did not prevent Al(maltol)3-mediated ROS production or the decrease of cell viability. Based on these results, we discussed the role of intracellular GSH against the onset of aluminum toxicity in the context of ROS production.


13. Inhibition of the human erythrocytic glutathione-S-transferase T1 (GST T1) by thimerosal.
Müller M et al.
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2001 Jul;203(5-6):479-81.

We have investigated the interaction of thimerosal, a widely used antiseptic and preservative, with the human erythrocytic GST T1 (glutathione-S-transferase T1). This detoxifying enzyme is expressed in the erythrocytes of solely the human species and it displays a genetic polymorphism. Due to this polymorphism about 25% of the individuals of the caucasian population lack this activity ("non-conjugators"), while 75% show it ("conjugators") (Hallier, E., et al., 1993). Using our newly developed HPLC-fluorescence detection assay (Müller, M., et al., 2001) we have profiled the kinetics of enzyme inhibition in erythrocyte lysates of two individuals previously identified as "normal conjugator" (medium enzyme activity) and "super-conjugator" (very high activity). For the normal conjugator we have determined a 2.77 mM thimerosal concentration to inhibit 50% of the GST T1 activity. In the case of the super-conjugator a 2.3 mM thimerosal concentration causes a 50% inhibition of the enzyme activity. For both phenotypes a 14.8 mM thimerosal concentration results in residual enzyme activities equal to those typically detected in non-conjugator lysates. Thus, sufficiently high doses of thimerosal may be able to change the phenotypic status of an individual--at least in vitro--by inhibition of the GST T1 enzyme.



14. Thimerosal induces neuronal cell apoptosis by causing cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor release from mitochondria.
Yel L et al.
Department of Medicine, University of California
Int J Mol Med. 2005 Dec;16(6):971-7.
   
There is a worldwide increasing concern over the neurological risks of thimerosal (ethylmercury thiosalicylate) which is an organic mercury compound that is commonly used as an antimicrobial preservative. In this study, we show that thimerosal, at nanomolar concentrations, induces neuronal cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Thimerosal, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, decreased cell viability as assessed by calcein-ethidium staining and caused apoptosis detected by Hoechst 33258 dye. Thimerosal-induced apoptosis was associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, generation of reactive oxygen species, and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to cytosol. Although thimerosal did not affect cellular expression of Bax at the protein level, we observed translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria. Finally, caspase-9 and caspase-3 were activated in the absence of caspase-8 activation. Our data suggest that thimerosal causes apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells by changing the mitochondrial microenvironment.


15. Mitochondrial mediated thimerosal-induced apoptosis in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-SH).
Humphrey ML et al.
Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25704-9388, USA.
Neurotoxicology. 2005 Jun;26(3):407-16.
   
Environmental exposure to mercurials continues to be a public health issue due to their deleterious effects on immune, renal and neurological function. Recently the safety of thimerosal, an ethyl mercury-containing preservative used in vaccines, has been questioned due to exposure of infants during immunization. Mercurials have been reported to cause apoptosis in cultured neurons; however, the signaling pathways resulting in cell death have not been well characterized. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the mode of cell death in an in vitro model of thimerosal-induced neurotoxicity, and more specifically, to elucidate signaling pathways which might serve as pharmacological targets. Within 2 h of thimerosal exposure (5 microM) to the human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH, morphological changes, including membrane alterations and cell shrinkage, were observed. Cell viability, assessed by measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the medium, as well as the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, showed a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in cell survival upon thimerosal exposure. In cells treated for 24 h with thimerosal, fluorescence microscopy indicated cells undergoing both apoptosis and oncosis/necrosis. To identify the apoptotic pathway associated with thimerosal-mediated cell death, we first evaluated the mitochondrial cascade, as both inorganic and organic mercurials have been reported to accumulate in the organelle. Cytochrome c was shown to leak from the mitochondria, followed by caspase 9 cleavage within 8 h of treatment. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was cleaved to form a 85 kDa fragment following maximal caspase 3 activation at 24 h. Taken together these findings suggest deleterious effects on the cytoarchitecture by thimerosal and initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.


16. Uncoupling of ATP-mediated calcium signaling and dysregulated interleukin-6 secretion in dendritic cells by nanomolar thimerosal.
Goth SR et al.
University of California-Davis, Davis, California, USA.
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jul;114(7):1083-91.
http://www.ehponline.org/members/2006/8881/8881.html

Dendritic cells (DCs) , a rare cell type widely distributed in the soma, are potent antigen-presenting cells that initiate primary immune responses. DCs rely on intracellular redox state and calcium (Ca2+) signals for proper development and function, but the relationship between these two signaling systems is unclear. Thimerosal (THI) is a mercurial used to preserve vaccines and consumer products, and is used experimentally to induce Ca2+ release from microsomal stores. We tested adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -mediated Ca2+ responses of DCs transiently exposed to nanomolar THI. Transcriptional and immunocytochemical analyses show that murine myeloid immature DCs (IDCs) and mature DCs (MDCs) express inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ channels, known targets of THI. IDCs express the RyR1 isoform in a punctate distribution that is densest near plasma membranes and within dendritic processes, whereas IP3Rs are more generally distributed. RyR1 positively and negatively regulates purinergic signaling because ryanodine (Ry) blockade a) recruited 80% more ATP responders, b) shortened ATP-mediated Ca2+ transients > 2-fold, and c) produced a delayed and persistent rise (>/= 2-fold) in baseline Ca2+. THI (100 nM, 5 min) recruited more ATP responders, shortened the ATP-mediated Ca2+ transient (>/= 1.4-fold) , and produced a delayed rise (>/= 3-fold) in the Ca2+ baseline, mimicking Ry. THI and Ry, in combination, produced additive effects leading to uncoupling of IP3R and RyR1 signals. THI altered ATP-mediated interleukin-6 secretion, initially enhancing the rate of cytokine secretion but suppressing cytokine secretion overall in DCs.DCs are exquisitely sensitive to THI, with one mechanism involving the uncoupling of positive and negative regulation of Ca2+ signals contributed by RyR1.


17. Fighting the Autism-Vaccine War
By Bernadine Healy, M.D. [former director of NIH]
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/brain-and-behavior/2008/04/10/fighting-the-autism-vaccine-war.html


18. Duane Alexander. M.D., NICHD director.
Quoted in:  NIH Agency Head: Vaccine-Autism Research is "Legitimate"  -  by David Kirby
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/nih-agency-head-vaccine-a_b_170034.html


19. Adversomics: the emerging field of vaccine adverse event immunogenetics.
Poland GA et al.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009 May;28(5):431-2.

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